Why NON-toxic Packaging

WARNING!

It is essential today’s world that you only use skin treatments and products that are NON-toxic and NON-hormone disrupting in men, women and children.

Product packaging MUST also be NON-toxic to avoid penetrating chemicals that cause acceleration of aging and disease.

Most Packaging today…
Bisphenol A (BPA) is often found in things we touch, eat, and buy. It’s hidden in grocery store receipts and beauty products, in coffee cups and soda cans, in food and water. Because BPA, phthalates and other plasticizers are not chemically bound to the plastics they’re added to, they are continuously released into our air and transferred to our skin when touched. Cancer and autoimmune disease rates continue to rise steadily. Small amounts of BPA can migrate from polycarbonate plastics or epoxy resin linings into foods, beverages and all skin and body products.

BPA is metabolized in the liver, and contrary to the results of industry-funded studies, independent studies have shown links to long-term health effects such as reproductive effects in males and females, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and increased risk of obesity and heart disease. Recent studies concluded that prenatal exposure to BPA is also associated with increased odds of wheezing and asthma early in life.

In Females…
In 2009, tests found estrogen-disrupting levels of BPA in 9 of 10 umbilical cord blood samples. Early life exposure was shown to increase adipogenesis (fat storage) in female rats. Another study showed that BPA exposure increases the risk of mammary precancerous lesions in female rats.

Irregular cycles, multiple ovarian cysts, and early onset of sexual maturation are a few of the adverse health effects observed in females following prenatal exposure to BPA. An increased incidence of miscarriage was observed in women following maternal exposure to BPA, even at low doses.

A pioneering study found a connection between BPA exposure and externalizing (aggressive and hyperactive) behavior in two-year-old girls.

In Males…
In male offspring of rats, prenatal exposure at doses lower than the established safe exposure level can result in an enlarged prostate in later life.

According to a study published in 2010 in Synapse long-term prenatal exposure to BPA leads to increased anxiety and cognitive deficits in mice. This conclusion is supported by previous research that showed an increase in aggressiveness in male rats following low-dose prenatal BPA exposure.

Human exposure to BPA in the workplace was linked to reduced fertility in male workers by causing reduced daily sperm production, erectile dysfunction, decreased libido, and ejaculation difficulties.

View video for more information on healthy, NON-toxic packaging.